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Hidden Rings of Fire.

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03 Dec 2017 22:01 #1 by ARLewis
ARLewis ► Hidden Rings of Fire.
Hidden Rings of Fire.

Dirt.

Mounds and mounds of dirt.

Wouldn’t think you’d have to worry about anything when one is just dealing with a mound of dirt, would you?

Exploration is a good thing. See new things, meet new people, have experiences that some never get to. But along with exploration should come caution. A healthy respect for the world, unknown habitats, and the simple unknown is necessary to not only enjoy but to survive all of the wonders that are out there. Think about it. Would you just walk right into a raging river you happen to come across? If one saw a grizzly bear out in a forest somewhere, would you go and poke it with a stick? Respect nature in all its forms and you should survive it. It might take one longer to travel, but safety first is a good motto.

In the case of exploring the Afterlife, this same respect is also needed as most of what we have to deal with in the real world can and will be dealt with there. Take a simple mound of dirt. Innocuous to the normal eye...it’s just dirt after all. Dirt. One of the basics from the element of earth. However, beware of the fire within. Wait...fire within dirt? Alchemists can debate that for hours. Disturb an inhabited mound of dirt however and you won’t have to debate. You will feel the fire.

Solenopsis Mandibularis, more commonly known as Fire Ants, tend to create mounds of dirt for their homes, Such nests are usually found under some kind of cover, rocks, logs, fallen trees, etc., but tend to thrive in moist areas where the soil has high precipitation levels. If there is nothing that can be used as cover, a dirt mound, usually around 40 cm high is created. Sometimes the mound can get to be as high as 1 meter in height.

Any being should not of course be judged entirely on its size. The bite, while painful in and of itself, is not the true worry. A typical fire ant will bite and hold on with its mandibles and then use a stinger within its abdomen to inject an alkaloid venom, solenopsin, causing a necro-toxic reaction that feels as if flesh has been thrust into a ring of fire. Within minutes, the skin would swell and white pustules would erupt. If enough venom has been injected, one could be sent into an anaphylactic shock .and become lethal.

One, single fire ant would most likely not have enough venom to kill. However, a single nest or mound could have thousands of fire ants, possibly created by multiple queens. A slight disturbance to the mound and a swarm could cause great damage or even kill small animals within seconds. It is almost impossible to get rid of a colony of fire ants once they have infested an area, mainly because so few of the mounds have only one queen. How any queens cooperate is unknown, but unless one can find and exterminate every existing queen, the colony can reform the thousands within a month.

Dirt. A deceptively simple mound of dirt can actually have a great amount of fire within its heart. Only dig into it if you are ready to pull out a ring of fire. A healthy respect for every “thing” that exists in nature is a necessary part of simple exploration. Sometimes though, a simple mound of dirt can be used as a good tactic to use against others as well. Just give your enemy the stick and let them poke it. Why get your own hands dirty...or burned?

ARLewis

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